Re: Marx - MIA in the Press

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2007 Iran on the Brink: Rising Workers and Threats of War by Andreas Malm and Shora Esmailian (published by Pluto Books)

In the early months of 2004, word of a planned May Day demonstration in Tehran was circulating. On a blog, Roza had come across some like-minded students in her city and they decided to go....Some of her high hopes were, however, quickly dashed. Enrolling in Komiteye Hamahangi, she was challenged by men and their patronising attitudes: "'Who are you, are you a real worker?', they would say. And when I asked about the revolution they would not respond. I would ask 'What do you mean by "abolishing wage labour", what is it supposed to look like in real life? Either one works and gets some money for it, or one works and gets a bag of rice and a chicken - what is it that you want?' They didn't specify."

After her encounter with organised feminism and socialism in the Islamic Republic of Iran, Roza took up writing herself. Her computer is now filled with Marxist classics downloaded from the Farsi-language division of the Marxist Internet Archive, as well as her own short stories, essays and commentaries on subjects ranging from the Khatonabad massacre to the merits and demerits of Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi. No money to buy a printer, her eyes ache from all her onscreen work.

February 5, 2007  New York Times “Who’s Attacking an Online Marxist Archive? China Is Suspected of Trying to Block Access to Texts” Noam Cohen interviews Brian Baggins

According to the Marxist Internet Archive, an online community that produces and organizes an ever-growing Marxist library, the wheel has turned full circle. People at the site believe that computer attacks primarily from China are jeopardizing its ability to provide Marxist texts, perhaps forcing the library to stop providing material in Chinese.

“We are not 100 percent sure this is the Chinese government; there are a lot of possibilities,” said Brian Baggins, who has worked on the archive since 1990. But he noted that the archive has been temporarily banned by the Chinese government before, about two years ago. “There is a motive,” he said. “They have done it to us in the past. What they are doing is targeting just the Chinese files.”

Summer 2006  Capital and Class (Issue 89)  “Research note on the Marxists Internet Archive” by Mike Bessler

Most radical and working-class organisations and novements are now largely marginalised and fragmented. The literature they disseminated and introduced to young people in the past is disappearing, and their voices are being drowned out by the babble of the mass media. New forms of radicalism that respond to this new situation are appearing, and one of these is the Marxists Internet Archive (MIA). The MIA brings together people of widely diverging views behind the common goal of creating and maintaining the world's largest digital library of Marxist works.

January 9, 2005  International Socialism (Issue 105)   “Marxism on the Web” by Martin Epsom and members of the MIA collective

Over the last decade the Marxists Internet Archive has become the most comprehensive online collection of left wing texts. Martin Empson spoke to some of the volunteers behind the project about their aims and methods.

[...]

The MIA has a fantastic variety of material. Can you give our readers some idea of the scope and quantity of the work you have collected?

Andy Blunden: The MIA has 38 language sections from Arabic to Urdu to Vietnamese, but 1,500 MB of the total of 2,500 Mb of data is in English and some language sections are very small. There are works by 430 writers. More significantly, there are 103 writers represented in the English language Marxist Writers Archive. The largest archives are the English language Lenin archive (3,900 documents), Marx-Engels archive (3,260 documents) and the Trotsky archive (1,264 documents). In addition to writers? archives there are historical documents from communist and labour history, and a glossary of biographies and Marxist terms in the MIA Encyclopedia of Marxism. Much of our material is scanned from old Progress Publishers books, but we also have new translations and transcriptions from original books and leaflets, some more than a century old. Currently we're getting about 450,000 hits (individual documents consulted) per day.

2002 Marx for a Post-Communist Era by Stefan Sullivan (published by Routledge)

Those who would like to sample the original texts of Marx and the Marxists could begin with Sidney Hook's anthology (with introductory essay), Marx and the Marxists (New York, Nostrand, 1955). However, today, readers can more conveniently access these online. Here, The Marxists’ Internet Archive (httm://www.marxists.org) provides an indispensable service for both the reader and researcher. It not only provides over 200 selections of Marx's and Engels's original work, but it has also archived numerous essays and monographs by Marxists, critics of Marxism, and philosophers working, loosely defined, in the Marxist tradition.

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